Progress report… still binding.

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As much work as it is, I’m glad I do a few at a time.  Each one I do, learn something that I apply to the next one before I forget it.  For example, after the purfling goes on, I’ve really started to clean the binding ledges much better.  Seems obvious, but its hard to determine what extents to go through with out a little trial and error.  I started to use a scraper with a back light.  My new motto is: if I can see the light, it won’t be tight.  My new alternative motto is: if I can see a gap, it will look like crap. My pg-13 motto is: make it fit, or it will look like shit.  Maybe I spend too much time by myself in the shop.

Anyhew…

The binding and graft are done on the second flamed maple guitar.  A pic of the channel mid-excavation is included for your viewing pleasure (yay, get excited).

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Ledges and purfling are done on the third guitar, that’s the cherry one.  Been kicking around several ideas for the graft.  Just decided on a different one in the car this morning.  Lots of little miters again.  Cut it and installed this morning.  Waiting for it to dry dry before continuing with binding, which I hope to finish this evening.

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If all goes well, I should have all three cleaned up tomorrow.  Minus sanding, which I will save for glue drying periods when I work on the necks.

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This is the end… graft.

End graft

Its a bit different than most, but I wanted to connect the rosewood purfling lines on the front and back.   I used a strip in the center of the end graft to make the connection, rather than continuing the binding all the way around, as in a traditional binding scheme.  Used a razor saw, chisel and router plane to excavate the the end channel.  I’d have to imagine I was done before I could have devised a fixture to route it.  One of the reasons I love hand tools… the binding ledges are a different story.

The first OO is all bound.  Scraped down the bindings and purfling.  Still need to sand everything.  The scheme I had in mind was to mirror the rosette color scheme.  Pretty happy with how it came out.  Overall there were very few gaps.  The gaps on my first guitar(s) were bigger and virtually disappeared after a bit of work on the finish, to the point where I can barely see them (believe me, I know exactly there they are).

Binding and rosette

Binding and rosette

Back view

Back view

Front view

Front view

 

Working on the second flamed maple guitar.  I’ll probably do the same thing?  Sometimes I change things in process.  Not sure what I’ll do on the third yet, but I have some ideas.