Making a couple rosettes

Hey, I have some time, so I’m catching up.

Here is how I made the rosettes for these two guitars.  I went with a geometric style.  Very similar to my first rosettes.

Started with humble beginnings of walnut, cherry and flamed maple.  These were glued up as you see here.



Then I used an incredibly high tech fixture to cut 45 and 42.5 degree angles on each piece.  The goal being 7.5 degree segments.



These segments were glued into logs.  Notice the “sorting matrix”.  This helped keep the pieces separate.  There were three different variations of wood placement and each of those had opposite angles on each side.



Then the logs were sliced and sorted.



Then I played with some variations of patterns.  There were a ton of permutations.



I picked two of my favorites.  Then I cut a test channel into a piece of scrap and bent up the purflings.  Fitting these was very low tech.  Cut to approximate size.



Inside and outside sanding block to fit.



Then I cut the channels into the real tops.  Used a home made circle scribe.  Now that I’ve done at least 12 channels with this scribe (7 for guitars and at least 5 tests), I should really take my time and make a nicer one on a mill.  This one was made with a hack saw, files, a drill press, and some taps and dies.  The only thing I would add is a dial height adjustment for the blade.  I made the blade, a spear point with  W1 tool steel that I sharpened, hardened and annealed.


Then a chisel, followed by a mini router plane.  




These are my 6th and 7th rosettes.  I’ve never used a power tool for this.  Cutting a .050″ deep, accurate channel, in a .095″ thick piece of soft wood was really intimidating at first.  After the first one, I loved it.  Its really one of my favorite parts.  I like the peace and quiet, as well as the clean cuts, when using hand tools.  

The first rosette ready to install.



This is my favorite part.  Planing and scraping down after the glue has cured.



First rosette done and scraped close to flush.



Second rosette installed.  This one in a cedar top.



This is where the guitars stood just prior to bracing the tops.



Ok.  Last two posts almost caught up to where I am now.

Should be closing these up soon.


Back in action! (or some other cheesy tag line of a similar nature)


back?shooting boardwhat was I doing here?


I was actually fairly unproductive this weekend compared to some.  But I did get a few things done.

Looked at the maple I cut for the backs and decided what grain orientation I liked.  Traced on the pattern and joined the edges.  Object is to see no light through the joint, which is not easy to do.  Joined… then held up to the window… then saw where the light was, touched up, back to window… saw where the light was…  Well, it took a few tries but I got one.

Using hot hide glue has been interesting.  You have less than a minute to spread glue, assemble and clamp.  Maybe more time if the room is hot, so that means I have less time.  Figured my best method was to get one side in place, spread glue on the other, wedge them together and weight the joint so it was even.  I think it looks odd, but worked.  A bonus is that I briefly got to use my other passion… random heavy industrial metal parts.

Tonight I cut out the shape and started to thickness.  I’ve only done this a couple times, but each time I think “damn you, asshole… learn to resaw better!”  I guess I can see why people use drum sanders.  I would imagine most mechanically inclined persons could a set a machine to a specific depth and push a button.  But it takes a very stubborn person to set up a plane and push it 15,000 times.  But its ok, I kind of like spending that kind of time on something, just looking, cutting, sweating, cutting, swearing, feeling, cutting, sweating… It was a good workout too.

Still more to go on this one.  Then, two more… Yay!

Apologies for going off a bit.  I think I’m dehydrated.

First rosette in first soundboard


This gallery contains 2 photos.

Phew!  One rosette in.  Just a bit more to clean up, mostly with the scraper.  A couple little chips in the mosaic I need to fill.  Pretty pleased so far.  I was a bit worried as my purfling is cut … Continue reading

Thickness planing backs and tops


This gallery contains 3 photos.

Prior plans of planing proceeding presently! Two redwood tops close to final thickness at around .105”-.110”.  I’ll scrape more after the rosettes are installed. One walnut back getting close and one more that hasn’t been started yet. Some areas of these were … Continue reading

Gluing up the plates


This gallery contains 4 photos.

More progress… Picked through my redwood tops and walnut backs, then traced a basic profile trying to avoid any undesirable spots. Used the shooting board and joined the soundboards.  They aren’t quite wide enough, so once the glue cured, I … Continue reading

Little tools are so cute!


This gallery contains 2 photos.

My first home made plane… Isn’t it precious! Just finished it.  Rosewood sides, not sure what the middle is.  Solid brass drawer pull cut down for the pin.  Didn’t really go off of plans, just figured I’d try.  Test cuts … Continue reading